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August 2013

  /    /  August

When you first bring home a new Service Dog candidate, it's easy to become overwhelmed at the sheer volume of "stuff" that needs to be mastered. While every Service Dog's end job may vary, there are foundational behaviors and concepts every working dog should know, no matter his or her specialty. Teams should be adept at skills in addition to the ones presented below (this list is not at all all-inclusive), but these are, without a doubt, the first five skills you should teach any Service Dog in Training.

Whether your partner assists you during a seizure, detects high or low blood sugar, pulls your wheelchair or performs any other job, learning how to teach a Service Dog to retrieve a beverage from the fridge and training your partner to do so can mitigate many disabilities. The training can be difficult, but with patience, a sense of humor and lots of really good treats, your Service Dog will be retrieving drinks* in no time!

Once your partner will take a dumbbell out of your hand and hold it under a variety of circumstances, it's time to teach him to pick it up off the ground and to introduce new objects. By the end of Part Three, your partner will be able to complete a formal Service Dog or obedience retrieve!

In today's culture, many people understand that a Service Dog "helps people." It's all too common, though, for people outside of the Service Dog community to have no idea what Service Dogs do for their people, how to recognize a Service Dog, or how to answer the question, "What is a Service Dog?"

While traveling with a Service Dog in the United States is your privilege, navigating airline policies, international laws, TSA regulations, security checkpoints and other commonly-encountered situations can be anything but smooth sailing. Here are some tips, tricks, guidelines and resources to ensure your trip is as stress-free as possible.

You know it takes work and practice to train a Service Dog to retrieve. You’ve managed to get your Service Dog to mouth at the dumbbell, but now you’re stuck. No matter what you try, your Service Dog keeps spitting the dumbbell out immediately. In this “Train a Service Dog to Retrieve” installment, learn how to continue to train your partner’s formal retrieve and how to easily and positively obtain the ever-so-elusive “hold” behavior.

International Assistance Dog Week (IADW) occurs every year beginning on the first Sunday in August, and International Assistance Dog Week 2013 started August 4th and will run through the 10th. This year, the theme is "Seeing, Hearing, Sensing, Supporting: There's a Dog For That!"

It's finally time. You've trained for months and put hundreds of hours into the four-legged friend currently by your side. He started this journey as a dog but is ending it as a partner. Once you complete the grueling Public Access Test, you guys will be officially declared a Service Dog team.

Several of our goals at Anything Pawsable include bringing you breaking news, keeping you informed of important developments in the Service Dog community and creating state-of-the-art training tutorials for tricks, obedience, public access behaviors and tasks. Thanks to our hard-working Service Dog in Training (SDiT) and Service Dog models, we're usually able to include helpful graphics and illustrations with our pieces.