Advertisements
Begin typing your search above and press return to search. Press Esc to cancel.

December 2017

  /  2017

While traveling with a Service Dog in the United States is your privilege, navigating airline policies, international laws, TSA regulations, security checkpoints and other commonly-encountered situations can be anything but smooth sailing. Here are some tips, tricks, guidelines and resources to ensure your trip is as stress-free as possible.

It's well known that logging performance is one of the keys to continual growth and progress. Whether it's a fitness program, painting, academic classes or dog training, you can't figure out where you're going if you don't know where you've been. When it comes to Service Dogs, though, a training log is even more vital, both for your safety and that of your dog.

Escalators and moving sidewalks are everywhere in today’s convenience driven-world. Today’s Service Dog teams are likely to regularly encounter them, especially teams that travel, work in a large or multi-story office building or those that enjoy frequenting the mall. For humans, getting on an escalator or moving sidewalk is simple: step on. For Service Dogs, though, there are some additional considerations for safety.

here's no question about it: evacuations are stressful. If they're required because of an impending disaster or emergency, they're even more difficult and scary. For people with a disability or those partnered with a Service Dog, evacuations require even more planning and thought than normal. Ensure you and your partner remain as stress-free as possible by preparing ahead of time and knowing what resources are available for you. Here's steps you need to take to develop a disaster or evacuation plan for people with disabilities who use Service Dogs.

While everyone should have a well thought out disaster plan, those with disabilities often have special concerns, such as having extra supplies, medications or other provisions.