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April 2020

  /    /  April

News is happening fast concerning the novel coronavirus (officially called COVID-19). Service Dogs present a special challenge for two reasons: 1) Service Dogs accompany their disabled handlers in public and 2) disabled handlers who use Service Dogs may have specific underlying health conditions that put them at higher risk for COVID-19. Anything Pawsable is working on developing continuing guidelines for Service Dog Handlers and Coronavirus COVID-19. This article will be updated continually as we have new and verified information. Before we get into Service Dog Handlers and Coronavirus, let's clear up a few things about how COVID-19 is different from the flu. The COVID-19 situation is changing rapidly. Since this disease new, people do not have immunity to it and a functional vaccine could be several months or more away. Doctors and scientists are working on estimating the mortality rate of COVID-19, but at present, COVID-19 is thought to be deadlier than most strains of the flu. Can dogs get coronavirus? First of all, there are many different types of coronavirus. The term "corona" refers to the crown shape the virus has when observed under a microscope. COVID-19 is the name for the specific type of coronavirus that is in the news today. Different coronaviruses can infect different species of animals and birds. There is a canine coronavirus ( technically called CCoV) which is a highly infectious intestinal infection in dogs, especially puppies. Canine coronavirus is usually short-lived, but may cause considerable abdominal discomfort. It is not transferable to humans. The coronavirus in the news is a new strain and is not thought to infect dogs. Can dogs carry or transfer coronavirus to humans? Currently there is no evidence that pets, working dogs or service dogs can transfer COVID-19, however, details are still emerging about how COVID-19 is transmitted. No studies have been conducted on pets and questions remain about how long the virus is viable for on a dog's fur, paws or saliva. Sheila McClelland, the founder of Hong Kong-based Lifelong Animal Protection Charity (LAP) wrote a letter to Hong Kong authorities which states, "Present evidence suggests that dogs are no more of a risk of spreading (coronavirus) than inanimate objects such as door handles." We already know that coronaviruses can live on surfaces and objects. Researchers are currently studying how long the virus can exist on surfaces — but the most recent information is that it can last for up to

What happens if you die? Who will take care of your pet or Service Dog? Nobody wants to think about their own death. Creating a plan for your animals can make the transition easier on your animals and those around you. Do you have a plan in case you become physically unable to care for them — or worse?