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Public Access

  /  Public Access

When it comes to Service Dogs or Service Dogs in Training with public access, there are definite things Service Dogs in public should and should not do. Learn more about how well-trained Service Dogs should appear and what U.S. Service Dog law says about dogs who don't quite possess the skills necessary to safely work in public

Federal law stipulates that a Service Animal is "any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability" and that a Service Dog teams are allowed to enter areas where the public is normally allowed to go. However, a Service Dog team's civil rights may be occasionally challenged by well-meaning people trying to keep pets out of the establishment. While stressful, these challenges are typically easy to handle. Sometimes, though, a little more work is required.

One of the most commonly asked questions is, “when is my Service Dog in Training ready for public access?” While that’s a question only you or your dog’s trainer can answer, here are 5 vital public access skills every Service Dog or Service Dog in Training needs to know before beginning work in public.

When it comes to hospital access rights for Service Dogs, United States federal law permits Service Dogs to accompany their disabled handler into in non-sterile, public areas. Cut through the chaos with this plain English explanation of the rules, exceptions, laws, requirements and expectations for Service Dog hospital access.

It's finally time. You've trained for months and put hundreds of hours into the four-legged friend currently by your side. He started this journey as a dog but is ending it as a partner. Once you complete the grueling Public Access Test, you guys will be officially declared a Service Dog team.

It was just a quick errand and you thought nothing of heeling your Service Dog in Training (SDiT) into the store. Her behavior is always excellent, she responds beautifully to your verbal commands — and you were just grabbing a couple of things. But when the manager approaches, your palms began to sweat. Even though you know that your state allows SDiTs and you’re doing everything correctly, answering questions about Service Dogs in public isn’t your favorite thing in the world.