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United States Service Dog Registry Tag

  /  Posts tagged "United States Service Dog Registry"

Introducing new gear to your Service Dog can be stressful for both you and your dog, but it really doesn’t have to be. Here are 10 tips that will help make the process easier – on both of you.

Escalators and moving sidewalks are everywhere in today’s convenience driven-world. Today’s Service Dog teams are likely to regularly encounter them, especially teams that travel, work in a large or multi-story office building or those that enjoy frequenting the mall. For humans, getting on an escalator or moving sidewalk is simple: step on. For Service Dogs, though, there are some additional considerations for safety.

They guide, listen, balance, lead and love. They provide friendship and independence, freedom and peace of mind. They live to serve their handler to the fullest extent of their capability, be it through retrieving dropped items, offering physical support to an unsteady handler or alerting a Deaf or hard of hearing handler to important events.

The 2014 Howly Jowly Giveaway is closed! Howly Jowly 2014: The Basics; The basics are simple: we're giving away training books, really awesome tasty treats and superbly high quality toys to as many Service Dog and SDiT teams as we can. There is no cost to enter or participate, shipping is free and anyone in the United States with a Service Dog or Service Dog in Training, whether or not you're a USSDR registered team, is welcome to participate. 

It's that time of year again that many of us begin to think about traveling. While traveling with your trained and well-behaved Service Dog is your privilege, there are some steps you need to take to make sure your trip goes as smoothly as possible.

The 5th annual ACVO National Service Dog Eye Exam event will provide a free eye exam to formally trained and certified Service Dogs and other working dogs such as Detection Dogs, Police dogs, Search and Rescue Dogs.

Having a Service Dog means a lot of things: independence, hope, mobility, confidence — but it also means something else: DOG HAIR and dealing with Service shedding.

As I am walking to the dumpster outside of my apartment complex, I get a whiff of stale alcohol and I stop dead in my tracks. Of course I’m at home and I should feel safe, but in my mind I’m taken back to that night 10 years ago…

Another mundane day in the office; stocking patient rooms, prepping a few IV lines because our intel is that we had 75/25 chance of getting rocketed tonight, sweeping the Iraqi dust out of our makeshift aid station, when suddenly my heart starts pounding, tears spring to my eyes and I feel out of control.